Travel Tips for Your Family

Having children does not mean you have to stop traveling. Although there are still many families waiting for the children to be of a certain age, or leaving them with other relatives to take long trips, the tendency to take the children with them is on the rise. A great news if we take into account that Spain has always been in line in Europe in terms of family trips abroad. Until now, a large majority still preferred Spanish coasts or camps to enjoy the summer. And, although both plans are very respectable, it is not the children who cut our wings to travel the world.

Find a destination that suits the little ones

Travel with your family

There are many countries that have great attractions for children. Water parks, attractions, themed, with animals, hotels where there are activities for them or places frequented by other families where our children can meet more children. Try to find common activities according to their age and call their attention. For example, in Asia a good idea is to introduce them to the snorkel and enjoy the seabed. In the jungle you can see different types of animals, zip line or play sports.

Choose direct routes

If you travel by plane, avoid flights have scales. If they have them, then they are not very long. Try, in addition, that the schedules are good for the children and that they do not break their biorhythm. During the trip, feel them near the windows, so you can go contemplating the landscape and have a further distraction. If the flight is at night, be sure to ask the stewardess for a blanket and pillow. The more rested they reach the destination the better they will feel. If the trip is long, we recommend that you bring them some entertainment. Some companies have sheets and paintings to distract you, also with coloring drawings and magazines where you can take advantage of the maps of the last pages to show them geography.

Includes the essential

Depending on the country you are traveling to, it will be convenient to carry everything your children need. It is better not to leave anything to improvisation, especially in medicines. Always carry a first-aid kit by hand. You never know if you can find medicines easily or at what price.

Do not be afraid

Many families acknowledge not taking their children with them for fear of something happening. However, there are many countries that are safer than ours. If traveling alone or as a couple, no mishap occurs, why would it happen to our children? What’s more, taking the children with us will open doors for us. In some countries in Asia or Africa, families tend to be very numerous, so they will be happy to help you, meet you and possibly your children will end up playing with ours.

Slow down

Although during the day they seem unstoppable and have more energy than us, children usually get tired before. Avoid long journeys full of visits, museums, meals composed by something quick and wanting to squeeze the trip to the top. Learn to enjoy a relaxed pace, with longer breaks so that children have time to eat and rest. The days will end sooner and you may have seen fewer things, but you will have enjoyed them longer.

Adapt to your schedules

Depending on the age, the child will have pre-established habits. Even if you are in the other part of the world and have the feeling that time does not exist, it is best not to alter them. Try that the different meals are at the same hours, that you sleep as necessary or that you are in bed at the established times. This will avoid that fatigue will lead to tantrums and that in the end it will be an uncomfortable situation for everyone.

Simplify

Depending on the age you will need more or less things. If your child does not walk, then here the question arises: Baby carrier or backpack? The only answer is destiny. If you are going to travel to a city where the streets are paved and it is easy to get around them, then you can afford to take the chair. If what you have planned is to do some hiking in the mountains, visit old villages or do outdoor activities, then the most comfortable thing is a baby carrier. During the trip you will see that many parents have also chosen this option. Forget about cribs, changing tables or other items. Many hotels already count on it.

5 Tips to Help You Prepare for International Business Travel

Travel overseas for business can be a fun adventure, but it also needs to be taken seriously. Before traveling to another country, whether for work or pleasure, it’s important to learn the customs and procedures of your destination, while also preparing yourself for your trip.

As a business traveler, you’re not only representing your country of origin to all of those you meet, but you are also a representative of your company. It’s important to be knowledgeable about the country you are planning on visiting as a way to show respect.

Besides requiring the correct documents like a visa and passport, there are other obligations you will likely need to complete before making your way overseas. Many of these requirements are specific to a particular destination based on the laws and regulations for the countries you are visiting. Make sure you do your homework well in advance so you know each of these requirements.

5 Tips for Overseas Business Travel

International travel for business can be a very exciting opportunity. You not only get to see new and interesting parts of the world, but you even get paid while doing it. In order to have the best experience possible, there are things you can do in advance to prepare. Here are five tips to help execute the perfect international business trip.

  1. Create an Organized Itinerary: Make sure that your days are packed with opportunities to help your company. Scheduling time for appointments, meetings, and personal time is very important to executing a beneficial international business trip. An itinerary should be a good guide for your trip’s goals and achievements. Because you do not want to waste any time on this trip, it’s better to plan in advance to take full advantage of the opportunity.
  2. Learn about the Culture and Customs: Before landing in said country, it’s important to understand the environment, culture and practices of this region. Knowing up-to-date news and information about your international travel destinations will help you avoid inappropriate comments or disrespectful behavior. Not only is it important to understand the culture, but it is also beneficial to know protocols, customs and etiquette as well. This includes things like: common greetings, religious practices, business manners, dietary practices, and acceptable humor.
  3. Learn the Native Tongue: While not every business trip requires learning a whole new language, it’s always advisable to seek out some basic vocabulary for the region you are visiting. The use of a translator might be beneficial as well. Communication is a huge part of business and breaking down those barriers will only help you with your business endeavors.
  4. Protect Yourself: Traveling internationally can be exciting, but also very stressful and sometimes dangerous. A new environment can mean new hazards and threats. Don’t avoid protecting yourself to save money. Sometimes travel insurance is a valuable way to reduce the risk of health crises and other types of risks.
  5. Stay Connected: Plan to use your communication devices while staying overseas. Make sure that your plan is available in other countries, or rent a cellphone from the airport. Communicating back and forth between your headquarters, while in a different country, is often an important part of international business. Communicating with your coworkers back at the office is an important part of international business travel.

Traveling internationally for business can be a new adventure. It’s becoming increasingly common as more and more U.S. companies also have offices overseas in places like Ireland, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, and Hong Kong. In 2014, Forbes rated Denmark as the #1 country for business.

Regardless of where you are traveling, planning ahead helps to make the experience as positive as possible. Know the culture of the places you are visiting, and when possible, make ongoing communication a vital part of your trip. Try to maximize your time spent overseas by preparing in advance for productivity. The more organized you are, the more time you’ll likely have to enjoy some sightseeing and leisure. Always remain respectful, while keeping your goal in sight.

Doin’ the Disney Drive: Tips for Happy Road Trips to Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida

Your family’s summer road trip to Walt Disney World is just around the bend, and maybe you’re beginning to identify with the Clark W. Griswold family, from “National Lampoon’s Summer Vacation.” Then again, with a little planning, maybe your journey won’t be a comedy of errors. Head down to the local video store, rent a copy of “Summer Vacation,” enjoy the family’s visit to Roy Wally World, and learn how NOT to drive cross-country. Afterwards, you may find some of these tips useful:

Have a place to crash. Nobody likes a late-night motel hunt, so if you reserve ahead you’ll be the family hero. If you’d rather keep your schedule flexible, create a list of alternate stopping points that offer decent meals and lodging (don’t forget the phone numbers). Phone ahead during the afternoon, once you have a better idea of how the day is shaping up, to be sure there’s a room waiting for you.

Keep the kids busy. Many families bring enough games and activities to last the entire journey, and some invest in DC-powered TV/VCR combos, or portable DVD players. Books-on-tape (or CD) are another great idea. The Harry Potter books are more than enough for a two-day journey in each direction.

Get tuned up. Nothing is more expensive or frustrating than a breakdown when you’re far from home. Service your car before you leave — check the tires, brakes, transmission and air conditioning, change the oil, and top-off all fluids. Take extra care if you’re driving your motor home or pulling a trailer — schedule a checkup several weeks in advance, just in case you need a special part.

Be safe. Let’s not fool ourselves. Driving is still more dangerous than flying. Improve your family’s odds by switching drivers frequently and traveling no more than 500 miles per day. 24-hour marathon drives may get you there sooner, but you’ll pay for it in risk and exhaustion. And face it, after a high-energy Disney vacation, the last thing anyone needs is a drowsy driver behind the wheel on the way home.

Do AAA. Make the most of your AAA membership and use its travel discounts, the latest news on highway construction, all the maps you can possibly want, and their famous Trip-Tik route planning service. If you don’t have a membership, a long car trip is a good excuse to get one.

Have fun on the way. Why put your vacation on hold until you reach Disney? Plan visits to nearby points of interest. Just what roads do lead to Orlando, and what are the sights?

East Coast travelers usually cruise south on I-95, switching to I-4 near Daytona. Popular side trips along the way include Washington D.C., Williamsburg, VA, Cape Hatteras, NC, Charleston, SC, and the Daytona/Cape Canaveral area in Florida.

Drivers a bit farther inland (to as far west as Pittsburgh) pick routes that include I-77, I-79 and/or I-81, eventually joining I-95 in South Carolina. For a great side route for history and nature buffs, stay on I-81 all the way to Knoxville, TN, where it joins I-75 for the march through Georgia. National Parks and Civil War battle sites dot the route from Gettysburg, PA down through the Shenandoah Valley (did you know Disney once wanted to build a theme park here?), and on through the Smoky Mountains.

I-75 figures into the plans of nearly anyone from Ohio to Chicago, St. Louis and beyond, as nearly every preferred route merges with I-75 before it reaches Georgia. The Chattanooga Tennessee/Northern Georgia area has a variety of interesting natural and historic sites, and it’s a perfect choice for your half-way stopover. Those farther south and west inevitably gravitate towards I-10, which hugs the Gulf coast until it, too, meets I-75 in Florida (who can resist a stop in New Orleans?) Once on I-75, Disney World-bound travelers head south past Ocala, Florida to Florida’s Turnpike, which cuts southeast towards Orlando and I-4.

Here’s hoping that your road trip is the finest kind of adventure!

Copyright © Jennifer Marx, PassPorter Travel Press. All Rights Reserved.